Publications

Publications in Peer Reviewed Scientific Journals

Muggleton, N. L., & Fincher, C. L., (2017). Unrestricted sexuality promotes distinctive short- and long-term mate preferences in women. Personality and Individual Differences111, 169-173.

Brown, G. D. A., Fincher, C. L., Walasek, L. (in press). Personality, parasites, attitudes and cooperation: a model of how infection prevalence influences ideology and social group formation. Topics in Cognitive Science.

Wincenciak, J., Fincher, C. L., Fisher, C. I., Hahn, A. C., Jones, B. C., & DeBruine, L. M. (2015). Mate choice, mate preference, and biological markets: the relationship between partner choice and health preference is modulated by women’s own attractiveness. Evolution and Human Behavior.

Fisher, C. I., Fincher, C. L., Hahn, A. C., Little, A. C., DeBruine, L. M. & Jones, B. C. (2014). Do assortative preferences contribute to assortative mating for adiposity? British Journal of Psychology, 105, 474–485.

Thornhill, R, & Fincher, C. L. (2014) The parasite-stress theory of sociality, the behavioral immune system, and human social and cognitive uniqueness. Evolutionary Behavioral Sciences, 8, 257–264.

Kandrik, M., Fincher, C. L., Jones, B. C., & DeBruine, L. M. (2014). Men’s, but not women’s, sociosexual orientation predicts couples’ perceptions of sexually dimorphic cues in own-sex faces. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 43, 965–971.

Fisher, C. I., Fincher, C. L., Hahn, A. C., DeBruine, L. M., & Jones, B. C. (2013). Individual differences in pathogen disgust predict men’s, but not women’s, preferences for facial cues of weight. Personality and Individual Differences, 55, 860–863.

Fox, M., Knapp, L. A., Andrews, P. W., & Fincher, C. L. (2013). Hygiene and the world distribution of Alzheimer’s disease: Epidemiological evidence for a relationship between microbial environment and age-adjusted disease burden. Evolution, Medicine, and Public Health, 2013, 173–186.

Thornhill, R., and Fincher, C.L. (2013) Commentary on Hackman, J. And Hruschka, D. (2013). Fast life histories, not pathogens, account for state-level variation in homicide, child maltreatment, and family ties in the U.S. Evolution and Human Behavior, 34, 118–124.

Thornhill, R., & Fincher, C. L. (2013). The comparative method in cross-cultural and cross-species research. Evolutionary Biology, 40, 480–493.

Jones, B. C., Feinberg, D. R., Watkins, C. D., Fincher, C. L., Little, A. C., & DeBruine, L. M. (2013). Pathogen disgust predicts women’s preferences for masculinity in men’s voices, faces, and bodies. Behavioral Ecology, 24, 373–379.

Thornhill, R., & Fincher, C. L. (2013). The parasite-driven-wedge model of parapatric speciation. Journal of Zoology, 291, 23–33.

Jones, B. C., Fincher, C. L., Welling, L. L. M., Little, A. C., Feinber, D. R., Watkins, C. D., Al-Dujaili, E. A. S., DeBruine, L. M. (2013). Salivary cortisol and pathogen disgust predict men’s preferences for feminine shape cues in women’s faces. Biological Psychology, 92, 233–240.

*Fincher, C. L., & Thornhill, R. (2012). The parasite-stress theory may be a general theory of culture and sociality (response article). Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 35, 99–119.

*This response article includes significant new empirical analyses not present in the target article.

*Fincher, C. L., & Thornhill, R. (2012). Parasite-stress promotes in-group assortative sociality: the cases of strong family ties and heightened religiosity (target article). Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 35, 6179.

*Although published in Behavioral and Brain Sciences this article is predominantly an empirical investigation, not a review article.

Eppig, C., Fincher, C. L., & Thornhill, R. (2011). Parasite prevalence and the distribution of intelligence among the states of the USA. Intelligence, 39, 155–160.

Thornhill, R., & Fincher, C. L. (2011). Parasite stress promotes homicide and child maltreat-ment. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, 366, 3466–3477.

Hoben, A. D., Buunk, A. P., Fincher, C. L., Thornhill, R., & Schaller, M. (2010). On the adaptive origins and maladaptive consequences of human inbreeding: parasite prevalence, immune functioning, and consanguineous marriage. Evolutionary Psychology, 8, 658–676.

Eppig, C., Fincher, C. L., & Thornhill, R. (2010). Parasite prevalence and the worldwide distribution of cognitive ability. Proceedings of the Royal Society B, 277, 3801–3808.

Thornhill, R., Fincher, C. L., Murray, D. R., & Schaller, M. (2010). Zoonotic and non-zoonotic diseases in relation to human personality and societal values: support for the parasite-stress model. Evolutionary Psychology, 8, 151169.

Letendre, K., Fincher, C. L., & Thornhill, R. (2010). Does infectious disease cause global variation in the frequency of intrastate armed conflict and civil war? Biological Reviews, 85, 669–683.

Møller, A. P., Fincher, C. L., & Thornhill, R. (2009). Why men have shorter lives than women: Effects of resource availability, infectious disease and senescence. American Journal of Human Biology, 21, 357–364.

Thornhill, R., Fincher, C. L., & Aran, D. (2009). Parasites, democratization and the liberalization of values across contemporary countries. Biological Reviews, 84, 113–131.

Fincher, C. L., & Thornhill, R. (2008). A parasite-driven wedge: infectious diseases may explain language and other biodiveristy. Oikos, 117, 1289–1297.

Fincher, C. L., & Thornhill, R. (2008). Assortative sociality, limited dispersal, infectious disease and the genesis of the global pattern of religion diversity. Proceedings of the Royal Society B, 275, 2587–2594.

Fincher, C. L., Thornhill, R., Murray, D. R., & Schaller, M. (2008). Pathogen prevalence predicts human cross-cultural variability in individualism/collectivism. Proceedings of the Royal Society B, 275, 1279–1285.

Thornhill, R., & Fincher, C. L. (2007). What is the relevance of attachment and life history to political values? Evolution and Human Behavior, 28, 215–222.

Book

Thornhill, R., & Fincher, C. L. (2014) The Parasite-stress Theory of Values and Sociality: Infectious Disease, History and Human Values Worldwide. New York, NY: Springer.

Book Chapters

Thornhill, R., & Fincher, C. L. (2015) The parasite-stress theory of sociality and the behavioral immune system. In Evolutionary Perspectives in Social Psychology, L. Welling, V. Zeigler-Hill and T.K. Shackelford, Eds. New York, NY: Springer.

Letendre, K., Fincher, C. L., Thornhill, R. (2012). Infectious disease, collectivism, and warfare. Pp. 351-371 in The Oxford Handbook of Evolutionary Perspectives on Violence, Homicide, and Warfare, T. Shackelford and V. Weekes-Shackelford, eds. Oxford University Press, New York, NY.

Invited Talks

2015, 20 May, Are infectious diseases a cause of human sociality? University of Central Lancashire, School of Psychology.

2014, 19 November, Are infectious diseases a cause of human sociality? University of Portsmouth, Department of Psychology.

2013, 5 July, Conference: “Relocating human origins: What if Adam lived in the forest?” University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.

2013, 5-8 September, Symposium: “Personality: causes and consequences of consistent behavioural variation” Herrenhausen Palace, Hannover, Germany.

 

Advertisements